Painted Plasterboard (also called Drywall)

Description:

This is a cladding used a lot in modern homes to seal a brick wall, or to create a dividing wall. This plasterboard material is generally very smooth with little to no texture.

What to expect:

Wall stickers and decals really stick well to this surface. It is the most recommended surface for wall quotes. The thing to watch out for is if the paint on the plasterboard is older or has any bubbles in the paintwork. If you place the decal over the bubble, when you eventually remove the decal, that bubble of paint will tear and come off with the decal.
Examples include false walls, small barrier walls, house and office walls.

Painted Plaster Walls

Description:

This is probably the most difficult surface that you can apply wall sticker to. The brick is covered in a thin layer of plaster, the plaster is then painted.

What to expect:

These walls have a very slight texture which comes either from the plaster or the paint roller. Wall decals will stick to these surfaces but the application can be tricky. When applying lettering it can be a little fiddly. Often the letters will want to remain with the backing paper they are supplied with, rather than attaching to the wall. To fix this, you will need to hold the decal onto the wall as you remove the supporting backing paper. Once the backing paper is removed, then you can press the design into the wall. Once you get it to the wall it will stay there. Because of the texture, you can sometimes lift the decal off and reposition before firmly pressing into wall.

Examples include house and office interior walls.

Rendered Walls

Description:

Rendered walls including walls treated with special suede finishes. Where the finish includes sweeps of plaster or rendered to create texture.

What to expect:

You can expect nothing at all. Definitely not recommended for wall decals and stickers. Also note that special paint finishes put on a normal plaster wall will not work either.

Examples include suede style/ Mediterranean style rendered walls and outdoor rendered walls.

Glass

Description:

We all know what glass is, but for the purposes of wall decals, remember that glass is a very hard surface and there is no texture at all.

What to expect:

The most difficult thing with glass is making both sides of the glass look good! If you have a decal on a sliding door, the front side might look great, but if you have any bubbles or imperfections behind the decal you will see this from the other side. Make sure the glass is very clean before applying. Make sure you ROLL the design onto the glass removing bubbles as you go, if you slap the design on flat, you will definitely get bubbles. Because of the hardness of the surface any bubbles or dirt under the decal will firstly be more obvious than on a slightly textured surface and secondly will be harder to remove.

Examples include house or office windows, sliding doors, shower doors, mirrors, car windows.

Metal

The same that applies to glass applies to metal – the only difference with metal is you don’t have the issue of seeing the decal from the reverse side.

Examples include fridges, microwaves, steel plaques, filing cabinets, metal fencing, car panels, motorbikes.

Plastics

Description:

This can either be shaped or flat plastic.

What to expect:

If the plastic is smooth like a plastic PET bottle surface -think Coke plastic surface- then you are all good and it is great for decals. However if you are trying to decorate a rough textured plastic, often found on plastic chairs  like the back of an office chair for example, it is very hard to say whether it will stick and predict how the vinyl will behave. If you are unsure it is best to get a sample first.

Examples of plastics decal stick to include wheelie rubbish bins, plastic storage tubs, plastic bicycles, trucks etc, cubby houses, musical instruments such as drum skins, front of keyboards.

Lacquered or Painted Wood

Description:

This is cured wood that is normally smooth and has been painted or lacquered. Could also refer to wood veneer surfaces.

What to expect:

We have experienced good success with applying vinyl to painted and lacquered woods. The surface still requires a smooth finish, and if freshly painted it is worth waiting a week or so until the paint has completely dried. Then apply the vinyl same as other smooth surfaces and the vinyl will stick.

Examples include pine furniture, parquetry floors, lacquered wall plaques, painted doors.

Raw Timber

Description:

Untreated or rustic wood which has been left with a natural rough finish.

What to expect:

Not suitable for vinyl.

Examples include rustic furniture, raw timber front doors, tables .

Fabrics and Canvas

Description:

Any fabric, either stretched on a frame, fabric on furniture, or loose fabric.

What to expect:

Vinyl will not stick to fabric. We often get asked if customers can apply vinyl lettering to stretched canvas. This is not recommended. Although the vinyl may stick for a short term, after some time it will start to peel off. If you lacquered the canvas, there might be a chance that the vinyl will stick to the lacquer, but not the raw fabric – but that is something we can’t guarantee.

Examples include satin, silk, cotton, canvas, stretched canvas.

These descriptions above should assist in making decisions about the most appropriate surfaces to apply wall decal to. If you unsure ask for a small swatch to test before purchase.

 

You can contact us any time should you have any further questions!